16.02.11

Employment Figures Continue to Move in the Wrong Direction

The latest UK employment figures show that once again the number of people in work has fallen and  both the number who are unemployed and those claiming Jobseeker’s Allowance went up.

The main details of the figures, covering the last three months of 2010, show that:

The number of people in paid work age 16 and over fell by 68,000 to 29.121 million, an employment rate of 70.5 per cent.  This represents a drop of 0.3 per cent compared with the previous three months.

The number of people unemployed rose by 44,000 to just under 2.5 million, representing an unemployment rate of 7.9 per cent.  The number of people unemployed for over 12 months was 833,000 up 17,000 from the three months to September 2010.

The number of people claiming Jobseekers Allowance (JSA) in January (the claimant count) rose by 2,400 to nearly 1.46 million.

The number of people age 16-64 classified as ‘economically inactive’ rose by 98,000 to 9.361 million, an economic inactivity rate of 23.4 per cent.

There were 500,000 job vacancies in the three months to January 2011, up 40,000 from the three months to October 2010 and up 20,000 from a year earlier.

In the three months to December 2010, 145,000 people had become redundant in the three months before the Labour Force Survey interviews, unchanged from the three months to September 2010 but down 23,000 from a year earlier.

As far as older workers are concerned:

The number of people age 50-64 in paid work in the last three months of 2010 fell by 24,000 to 7.29 million.  Although the number of people age 65 and over in work rose by 23,000 to 874,000.

The total number of people aged 50 and over who were unemployed fell by 11,000 to 383,000, while the number claiming Jobseeker’s Allowance in January stayed the same as in December at 223,500.  In terms of long-term unemployment and the long-term JSA claimant count (12 months and over), the proportion remained higher in this age group than any other.

Read TAEN’s press release.

  • Share with